Art and Design, Vol. 3, Issue 1, Mar  2020, Pages 69-77; DOI: https://doi.org/10.31058/j.ad.2020.31007 https://doi.org/10.31058/j.ad.2020.31007

Human-Computer Interaction in the History of New Media Art

Art and Design, Vol. 3, Issue 1, Mar  2020, Pages 69-77.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.31058/j.ad.2020.31007

Ke Du 1*

1 School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

Received: 5 December 2019; Accepted: 31 December 2019; Published: 6 February 2020

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Abstract

With the rapid development of digital electronic technology, new media technology is also showing the rapid development of export, thus providing more possibilities for the creation of new media art. New media artists began to try different media, combined with theatre, dance, film, video and other different artistic forms to create, not only led to the development of visual art, science and technology art and audio-visual technology, but also produced cross-cutting creation and other multi-element development. Under the influence of the development of science and technology, interactive art and emerging media, the development of art gradually moves from cross-media to cross-border cooperation of art, so that artists can express their creative ideas in a diversified attitude. Thus communication and cooperation have also become the focus of artists attention in the new media art creation, and the structure of interactive situation has become the first factor to be considered in artistic creation. The interactivity and integration of new media art make art more affinity, reduce the sense of distance of elite art, and receive wide attention and love from the public.

Keywords

New Media Art, Human-Computer Interaction, Digital Image, Science and Technology, Interactive Art

Copyright

© 2017 by the authors. Licensee International Technology and Science Press Limited. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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